Osteopenia or Osteoporosis? Try a weighted vest

 Osteopenia or Osteoporosis? Try a weighted vest

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis affects 54 million Americans, mostly women. Millions more Americans are estimated to have osteopenia (low bone mass), putting them at risk for osteoporosis.

We typically reach our peak bone mass density around the age of 30 and then spend the rest of our lives trying to maintain as much bone density as we can.

From an exercise perspective, we know that weight bearing exercises can help to stabilize bone density.  I recommend all of my patients participate in a regular, progressive load bearing strength training program. If they have Osteopenia or Osteoporosis, it is non-negotiable, you must strengthen!

Another way to add positive “weight” is to exercise with a weighted vest.  Many of my clients like to walk, hike, or jog and I recommend an adjustable weighted vest to create additional weight without the adverse effects of excessive body weight.  

Benefits include: better balance, stronger legs/hips, and improved long-term bone density stabilization.

Weighted Vest Guidelines:

  1. Consult with your Physician to see if it is appropriate for you and your current state of health.
  2. Your goal is to have an additional 15% of your body weight, but you must start slowly.  For example, if you weigh 140 lbs, your goal weight is about 20 lbs (~15%). You would then purchase a 20 lbs adjustable weighted vest and start at 4-6 lbs and let your body adjust to the new weight.
  3. Do not add additional weight until your body adjusts to the weight
  4. Be sure to have a proper fitting vest as you want it to fit snuggly and make sure you have the weight equally distributed front to back.   
  5. If you are not a runner, try to “power walk” as bone density is related to impact.
  6. You can also wear your vest during daily activities around the house.  

 

Do your homework and research different brands but many of my patients have purchased the “Mir Women’s Adjustable weight vest” and have been very happy with the purchase.  

Click here to shop  Amazon.com for your weighted vest:  

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Thanks,

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy Video: Treat ankle Trigger Points for ankle pain

Learn how to use a “peanut” to help alleviate lateral (outer) ankle pain from trigger points in the muscles of the fibula. Please let know if you have any questions,

Thanks,

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy video: How to treat lateral (outer) ankle pain with fibular mobilizations

After a inversion ankle sprain or foot injury, it is very common to have residual ankle pain. Watch this short video to learn how to mobilize your fibula to restore better dorsiflexion to your ankle and hopefully reduce your pain. Please let me know if you have any questions,
Thanks,
Ed Deboo, PT
Bellingham Physical Therapy

Knee taping for a hyperextension injury

Help to protect the posterior capsule of your knee after a mild hyperextension injury with a simple taping techniques. Watch the video to learn more and have a great weekend

~ Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham, Physical Therapy

Taping for anterior knee pain from infra-patellar fat pad irritation (video)

If you are experiencing anterior knee pain it could be a patellar tracking issue or an irritation of the infra-patellar fat pad. Watch this short video to learn how to tape your knee to unload the fat pad,
Thanks for watching and let me know if you have any questions,
Ed Deboo, PT
Bellingham Physical Therapy

Over 40 and lift weights? Are you getting enough protein to maximize your gains?

 

                                                                                   

 

                                                      Better aging through Science:

 

So you are over 40 and you lift weights, but do you get enough protein to maximize your gains?  The FDA currently recommends 56 grams of protein for men and 46 grams for women, but a review of 49 high quality studies published recently in the British Journal of Medicine found those numbers to be way too low….

 

Men and women who ate more protein while weight training did develop larger, stronger muscles than those who did not. How much more? Up to 10% increase in strength and 25% increase in muscle mass compared to those who lifted but did not increase their protein levels.

 

But how do you calculate how much protein you need?  We got you covered, just takes a bit of math. The ideal protein consumption is  1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. For us that use pounds and not kilograms, remember 2.2 lbs per 1 kilogram.  In practical terms, that would amount to about 130 grams of protein a day for a 180 pound man.

 

Foods with high protein content include tuna at 40 grams, chicken breast at 25 grams, whey protein shakes 24 grams per scoop, and eggs that have about 8 grams of protein each. So do a quick protein count and see if you measure up.  

 

I know I wasn’t getting enough protein in my diet to meet these guidelines, maybe that’s why I’m so skinny  🙂

Purchase your protein powder today from Amazon.com:

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham Physical Therapy

 

Stretching and Trigger Point work to the Levator Scapulae muscle.

Difficulty with turning your head due to pain and tightness could be a Levator Scapulae issue. Learn how to palpate, treat, and stretch this muscle. Please let me know if you have any questions

~ thanks, Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham, Physical Therapy

 

Manual Therapy and Exercise prescription for common Shoulder injuries: Power Point presentation

Hey everyone,

This is the slide presentation from my class on February 20th to the Northwest Massage Connection group.  Please let me know if you have any questions,

Thanks,

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham, Physical Therapy

 

Learn how to tape your knee for patellar pain

Pain with going up or down  stairs, difficulty squatting or running?  You may have patellar femoral pain that responds well to a taping technique you can do yourself.  Watch the video below to learn how.  Please let me know if you have any questions,

Thanks,

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham Physical Therapy

Treat and stretch the subscapularis of the rotator cuff

We are blessed with abundant recreational activities to do in Bellingham, but most of them need a healthy shoulder.  Trigger points in the subscapularis of the rotator cuff can be a major player in shoulder pain.  However, the muscle can be difficult to find and treat.  Watch the video below to learn how to identify, treat, and then stretch the subscapularis.  Please let me know if you have any questions,

Sincerely,

Ed Deboo, PT

Bellingham Physical Therapy